Ans. Ans. Nature therefore offered a transcendental experience involving an aspect of pantheism, the idea that the divine is a part of all. Ask your question. The poet compares the daffodils to stars because the daffodils stretch in never-ending line like the stars in the galaxy. Ask your question. The peak of the poet’s ‘bliss’ here is that his heart ‘dances with the daffodils.’ It’s almost as though the scene is recreated, and this time the poet can actually participate in the ‘show’ rather than just be an observer. I wandered lonely as a Cloud That floats on high o'er vales and Hills, The speaker describes how he walked around and felt as lonely as a cloud. Answer: The daffodils fill the poet’s heart with pleasure and he feels happy with them. Wordsworth has used images appealing to the sense of sight such as “lonely as a cloud”, “ a crowd”, “never-ending line”, ”milky way” and “jocund company.” It becomes a permanent source of wealth or treasure to which he can turn in times of distress or need. The speaker likens themselves—or specifically, their "lonely" way of wandering—to a cloud. Q. A host, of golden daffodils; Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Add your answer and earn points. He was one of the eminent nature poet. After describing the daffodil's beauty, he proceeded on to tell about the beauty of its background and the nice setting it made on the daffodils. They reminded him of the Milky Way, because there were so many flowers packed together that they seemed to be neverending. Just as the stars shine along the curves of the heavens, similarly the daffodils the daffodils glow in along the bank of the lake. We’re they really ten thousand in number?A. The word seems to suggest that this stanza will present us with the explanation for why the poet says that watching the ‘show’ brought him ‘wealth’. • Line 9: The speaker says that the line of daffodils is “never-ending,” but we know this can’t be strictly true: all good things come to an end. You can specify conditions of storing and accessing cookies in your browser. 7 Continuous as the stars that shine. They usually grow near lakes. Romantic literature has also provided an escape from the materialr world of capitalism and industrialisation. b) Why does the poet refer to it as ‘wealth’?A. The memory of dancing and fluttering daffodils fills his heart with pleasure.It is like a spiritual vision that brings a feeling of joy. This happens because of solitude. The waves beside them danced; but they In the first stanza the speaker describes a time when he meandered over the valleys and hills, \"lonely as a cloud.\" Finally, he came across a crowd of daffodils stretching out over almost everything he could see, \"fluttering and dancing in the breeze\": In the second stanza the speaker goes into more detail about the daffodils. Q.11). What were your initial thoughts while reading this poem? The waves beside them danced; ... ("Daffodils") From Audio Poem of the Day June 2015. Along the margin of a bay: Ten thousand saw I at a glance. Ans).The sight of the daffodils becomes a treasure cove that lifts the poet’s spirit and rejuvenates him in times of loneliness and despair. Its theme is the relationship between the individual and the natural world, though those daffodils are obviously … The poet compares the daffodils with the stars which twinkle in the galaxy because like stars, the daffodils were quite large in number and uncountable. Log in. Which line from the poem BEST creates the tone of lines 1-6? (iii) Explain the lines : Ten thousand saw I … Ans. Also interesting in this stanza is the difference between the actions of ‘fluttering’ and ‘dancing’. The Milky Way is a cluster of stars which shines brightly in space. The daffodils are tossing their heads about in a joyous and merry dance. They stretched in never-ending line = The daffodils (they) are ( stretched = si estendono) in never-ending line (fila infinita) The sight of the daffodils amazes the poet at first because of their great number in fact they a crowd, continuous, ten thousand (saw I at a glance = viste con un’occhiata), host, never ending-line. Did you notice the contrasts in this stanza? Before analyzing a text, we want to understand its literal meaning. Ans). The words “crowd” and “host” suggest a multitude or a large number of daffodils. Q. Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. In this stanza, it isn’t just the flowers but also the waves that are dancing. They stretched in never-ending line. e) Had the poet realised the importance of the scene when he had first seen it? Continuous as the stars that shine. Growing along the curve of the lake, the daffodils remind him of the stars that shine along the curve of the heavens. Post was not sent - check your email addresses! For a short poem, you can do a word by word paraphrase. Why is dance important in the poem? 9. Vales means valleys. They stretched in never-ending line. The poet is referring to the wealth of being, happy, the wealth of joy. A host, of golden daffodils; Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Often known simply as ‘Daffodils’ or ‘The Daffodils’, William Wordsworth’s lyric poem that begins ‘I wandered lonely as a cloud’ is, in many ways, the quintessential English Romantic poem. How the poet has described the daffodils? Ans). According to the poet, the daffodils which covered the shore of the lake seemed to be unending like the stars in the sky and like them (the stars of Milkyway), they were too twinkling. They stretched in never-ending line Along the margin of a bay: Ten thousand saw I at a glance, Tossing their heads in sprightly dance. 3. He is all alone. ... ("Daffodils") From Audio Poem of the Day June 2015. The poet makes such a comparison, because to him, the daffodils seemed to grow in never-ending lines like the stars in a galaxy. In the third stanza, the speaker compares the waves of the lake to the waves of daffodils and decides that even though the lake is “sparkling,” the daffodils win because they have more “glee.” It is even more vibrant now, and the addition of the description ‘tossing their heads’ really does make it seem as though the flowers have an active will of their own. A reading of Wordsworth’s classic daffodils poem by Dr Oliver Tearle. They stretchd in never ending line. Continuous as the stars that shine And twinkle on the Milky Way, They stretched in never-ending line Along the margin of a bay: Ten thousand saw I at a glance, Tossing their heads in sprightly dance. In the second stanza the daffodils become even more important. That floats on high o’er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host, of golden daffodils; Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. For Example “They stretched in never-ending line, along the margin of a bay: Ten thousand saw I at a glance, tossing their heads in sprightly dance.” The way Wordsworth talks about the stars and how he saw them, is very easy to understand making it possible for readers to understand.
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